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Photos of Nain and Hopedale a trip back in time

Juliana Winters looks at a photo that was taken of her by Cochrane in one of the photographers earlier visits to the area.
Juliana Winters looks at a photo that was taken of her by Cochrane in one of the photographers earlier visits to the area.

People in Nain and Hopedale got a trip back in time recently. Andrea Procter, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) with the Tradition and Transition Research Partnership, and Candace Cochrane, a photographer, held a public photo exhibit in both communities of photos Cochrane took between 1967 and the 1980’s in the area.

“What she's doing now is taking the photographs back to Nain and Hopedale and having these exhibits of them,” Procter told TC. “Putting them up, having people come in and identify people in the pictures, browse around and talk.  We want to talk with people in the community to collaborate and put together a book of the pictures with text of people stories, writings or thoughts about the time between 1969 to 1986.”

Cochrane was initially hired to take photos of the nursing stations and then in the 80’s was contracted to take photos for the schools. Procter said it is a time that was not as well documented, there are many historical photos about the times before then but that period had a lot of changes. Cochrane said her photo’s offer a slice of life, which wasn’t as common in photos from that time.

“It gives me a reason why I took all these pictures,” she said. “Not the reason for which I was hired but to come back all these years later with the pictures so people can relive the memories. People had cameras but they did not they didn't just take everyday pictures of people working and hanging out. They were always formal photos, weddings, birthdays or something like that. I'm providing a slice of life, everyday life, which helps them bring back stories about the day they did this, or that.”

They are exhibiting the photos so people can identify the people in them and maybe offer stories as background, for the book they plan to produce in conjunction with the Nunatsiavut government. Procter said they had many people come out to see the exhibits, to see places and people as they were.

“Especially the older photos people see relatives who passed away,” Procter said. “In the 1985-86 timeframe there's a lot of people were still around but a lot of people don't know them as the young people they see in the photograph.”

She said there are many pictures of the fishery, which was still really active in the 80s, so there are pictures of summer places were people went to live and fish for the summer. 

“People seem to really enjoy seeing the pictures of people actively doing things, doing the work. The busyness of these pictures, of the time. It was a lot easier, it was a simpler life.”

They hope to have the book as much from the Inuit perspective as possible, to gather something that reflects their memories and perceptions of that time.

Cochrane said it has been quite a trip back in time for her as well. The people in the photos had been frozen in time for her and now she sees them aged or passed away.

She said she would like to come back and do photos of then and now, try to find the exact same spot and the same people and take their pictures again.

 

“What she's doing now is taking the photographs back to Nain and Hopedale and having these exhibits of them,” Procter told TC. “Putting them up, having people come in and identify people in the pictures, browse around and talk.  We want to talk with people in the community to collaborate and put together a book of the pictures with text of people stories, writings or thoughts about the time between 1969 to 1986.”

Cochrane was initially hired to take photos of the nursing stations and then in the 80’s was contracted to take photos for the schools. Procter said it is a time that was not as well documented, there are many historical photos about the times before then but that period had a lot of changes. Cochrane said her photo’s offer a slice of life, which wasn’t as common in photos from that time.

“It gives me a reason why I took all these pictures,” she said. “Not the reason for which I was hired but to come back all these years later with the pictures so people can relive the memories. People had cameras but they did not they didn't just take everyday pictures of people working and hanging out. They were always formal photos, weddings, birthdays or something like that. I'm providing a slice of life, everyday life, which helps them bring back stories about the day they did this, or that.”

They are exhibiting the photos so people can identify the people in them and maybe offer stories as background, for the book they plan to produce in conjunction with the Nunatsiavut government. Procter said they had many people come out to see the exhibits, to see places and people as they were.

“Especially the older photos people see relatives who passed away,” Procter said. “In the 1985-86 timeframe there's a lot of people were still around but a lot of people don't know them as the young people they see in the photograph.”

She said there are many pictures of the fishery, which was still really active in the 80s, so there are pictures of summer places were people went to live and fish for the summer. 

“People seem to really enjoy seeing the pictures of people actively doing things, doing the work. The busyness of these pictures, of the time. It was a lot easier, it was a simpler life.”

They hope to have the book as much from the Inuit perspective as possible, to gather something that reflects their memories and perceptions of that time.

Cochrane said it has been quite a trip back in time for her as well. The people in the photos had been frozen in time for her and now she sees them aged or passed away.

She said she would like to come back and do photos of then and now, try to find the exact same spot and the same people and take their pictures again.

 

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