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Collaborative podcast tackles water management

A new podcast, www.waterdialogues.ca, discusses water issues in indigenous communities across the country.
A new podcast, www.waterdialogues.ca, discusses water issues in indigenous communities across the country.

A new podcast was launched last week to talk about the issue of water in indigenous communities across the country. The podcast, www.waterdialogues.ca, is an initiative spawned from an 18-month Canadian Water Network-funded research project on the topic.

Lindsay Day, MSc candidate in the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, and creator of the Water Dialogues podcast, said it is aimed at creating space for a different kind of discussion around water issues, one that brings indigenous and western sciences and ways of knowing together on equitable terms.

“The perspectives, values and ways of knowing of Indigenous peoples in Canada have largely been ignored in decision-making processes around water, and our research demonstrates this as well,” said Day. “While there is growing recognition that we need to do things differently, how to effectively and respectfully navigate approaches that engage diverse knowledge systems is an ongoing learning process.”

The podcast uses a narrative audio-documentary form to relay recordings taken from two national Water Gathering events held during the research phase. The events brought together 28 Indigenous and non-Indigenous water experts, researchers, and knowledge holders from across Canada, including representatives from the Nunatsiavut and Nunatukavut governments.

“The whole research project and Water Dialogues podcast was founded on a collaborative approach, and the feedback from everyone in the podcast has been overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic,” said Day. “Certainly the best part of this project is all the dedicated people behind it, and the powerful voices and wisdom within this podcast from which we can all learn.”

An interdisciplinary team of women from four universities - the University of Guelph, Queen’s University, Dalhousie University, and Cape Breton University - lead the project. Day said it is unique in bringing perspectives from First Nations, Inuit, Metis, and settler peoples in Canada together to learn how to live better with water. The podcast is supported by a Canadian Water Network knowledge translation grant.

Evan.careen@tc.tc

 

Lindsay Day, MSc candidate in the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, and creator of the Water Dialogues podcast, said it is aimed at creating space for a different kind of discussion around water issues, one that brings indigenous and western sciences and ways of knowing together on equitable terms.

“The perspectives, values and ways of knowing of Indigenous peoples in Canada have largely been ignored in decision-making processes around water, and our research demonstrates this as well,” said Day. “While there is growing recognition that we need to do things differently, how to effectively and respectfully navigate approaches that engage diverse knowledge systems is an ongoing learning process.”

The podcast uses a narrative audio-documentary form to relay recordings taken from two national Water Gathering events held during the research phase. The events brought together 28 Indigenous and non-Indigenous water experts, researchers, and knowledge holders from across Canada, including representatives from the Nunatsiavut and Nunatukavut governments.

“The whole research project and Water Dialogues podcast was founded on a collaborative approach, and the feedback from everyone in the podcast has been overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic,” said Day. “Certainly the best part of this project is all the dedicated people behind it, and the powerful voices and wisdom within this podcast from which we can all learn.”

An interdisciplinary team of women from four universities - the University of Guelph, Queen’s University, Dalhousie University, and Cape Breton University - lead the project. Day said it is unique in bringing perspectives from First Nations, Inuit, Metis, and settler peoples in Canada together to learn how to live better with water. The podcast is supported by a Canadian Water Network knowledge translation grant.

Evan.careen@tc.tc

 

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