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Service dog Tank retires from N.L. RCMP

RCMP Sgt. Bill Frisby with police dog Tank. After a seven-year career, Tank retired in November 2017.
RCMP Sgt. Bill Frisby with police dog Tank. After a seven-year career, Tank retired in November 2017. - RCMP

It’s been a memorable seven years for Tank, a canine with the RCMP’s police dog service unit in Newfoundland and Labrador

Born in August 2008 at the Innisfail Training Centre in Alberta, he completed his training in July 2010. On Nov. 16, the RCMP celebrated his retirement.

“Over his years of service to the RCMP, Tank has found missing berry pickers, criminals and even accident victims that had wandered into the woods,” Sgt. Bill Frisby, the German shepherd’s handler and lead of the police dog service unit in the province, said in a news release.

He’s also searched for drugs, firearms and other evidence in police investigations, and visited numerous schools, seniors’ homes and community groups.

“Tank was a dedicated team player. As soon as we arrived to any scene, he was ready to give 100 per cent,” Frisby said.

Tank lived with Frisby and his family while he was a member of the police dog service unit.

Service dogs usually retire at the age of seven, and it’s up to their handlers where they live then.

Some are placed into waiting homes that have been on a list to adopt a police dog.

Tank will spend his retirement with the Frisby family.

Tank is Frisby’s second dog. His first service dog was a German shepherd named Muzak.

“The most rewarding and also the most difficult part of the job is the attachment that develops between the handler and the dog,” Frisby said.

“If your dog gets injured, sick or passes away it can take an emotional toll.”

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