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Great demand


There was some great news today for a program aimed at helping Labrador cancer patients.

At a media event this morning at the Goose Bay Airport, the Canadian Cancer Society-NL division, received cash and in-kind support to go towards it’s Air Daffodil program — a travel fund implemented in 2013 as a pilot project, which was specifically designed to go towards air travel costs for cancer patients from anywhere in Labrador to use for treatment and appointments outside the region.

Air Daffodil was recently re-branded from the former Labrador Air Travel Assistance Program.

Peter Woodward, vice president of operations for Woodward Group of Companies based in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, donated a Buick Encore valued at $33,615.00, which is now up on tickets as a fundraiser for Air Daffodil.

“Labrador has been very good to the Woodward Group and the Woodward family,” said Woodward. “So we’re always looking for ways to give back. So many families in our communities are being impacted by cancer these days. Al (Pelley, vice president of philanthropy for the CCS-NL division) talked about the success they’ve already had over the past year, and I got to be honest; it really moved me and I knew the impact on so many people.

“We’re hoping this is going to be a tremendous fundraiser (and) really hoping this program is going to perpetuate Al’s group and help all the families of the communities to get the treatment they need.”

Stephen Dinn, vice president of business development for Provincial Airlines, also made a generous donation to Air Daffodil today with a cash donation of $10,000.

“I think everybody here is impacted by cancer, whether themselves or family members, colleague or friend,” he said. “We were more than happy to help out with this exciting partnership. We really wanted to give back to the people of Labrador, and felt this was a really special way to do that. We’re going to provide some discounted flights for travel and start off with an initial donation.”

Todd Russell, president of NunatuKavut Community Council, also donated $5,000 on behalf of the NCC, the third donation in that amount over the last two years.

“What a great cause it is when you can help people with the toughest challenge of their life and to  make that challenge little easier,” said Russell. “It’s beautiful to see such diversity of giving from our corporate friends and those so much a part of our community. Many of our people live in communities where travel is difficult. We are a non-profit organization, but we do what we can to give back.”

Demand

Al Pelley, vice president of philanthropy for the CCS-NL division, said when the program first started, no one anticipated the high volume of usage it would get.

Over a period of 14 months, the program has provided a total of 204 one-way flights at a cost of approximately $108,000. Due to the high usage, the program was suspended until more funds could be raised.

“The demand for the service was much greater than we had ever anticipated, which resulted in periodic interruptions in program delivery due to a lack of funds,” explained Pelley.

“As the air travel program was a pilot project, the Society conducted a review to improve efficiencies. In order for this program to continue, it would be necessary to find sustainable funding, develop criteria for client usage and seek out new partners. It was determined that our annual operating budget would be  $100,000 per year. It was further determined that we should have half of that amount — $50,000 — raised before we implement phase II of this program to avoid any further program delivery interruptions.”

Pelley says Air Daffodil has literally been a lifeline for cancer patients in Labrador since it started, calling a cancer diagnosis a major stress due to the heavy financial burden that comes with it.

“This is particularly true for people living with cancer in Labrador,” he said. “It sometimes causes patients to miss treatments because they simply cannot afford the up front costs for travel. This concern was brought to the CCS by a group of concerned individuals and we responded by initiating a fundraising campaign and establishing an air travel assistance program specifically living with cancer in Labrador.”

Valerie Rachwal knows all too well the financial stress associated with a cancer diagnosis.

“I was diagnosed with breast cancer in December of last year,” she told those at the announcement today.

“I was able receive a mastectomy and chemotherapy here in Goose Bay, and I’m presently getting targeted therapy treatments until next April. Since my cancer diagnosis, I have so far had to travel four times to St. John’s to receive medical care that isn’t available in Labrador. Three of those trips were made possible by Air Daffodil. Thanks to this program I was also provided with a ticket for my husband to travel with me as an escort to my very first oncology appointments.”

Rachwal said the first appointments as a cancer patient can be very overwhelming and being able to have someone there for emotional support is very important. 

“Without the help of Air Daffodil  I would have been there alone. This summer, I had to spend a month in St. John’s to receive my radiation treatment. For part of that time, I was able to say at Daffodil Place. On the weekends, I saw many cancer patients staying there leave to drive back to their hometowns on the island. They would return in time to continue their treatments on Monday’s. Unfortunately, patients from Labrador, like myself, don’t have that option.”

Rachwal says it’s not easy being away from family and friends for extended times while getting cancer treatments. 

“Thanks to a community fundraiser, I was able to have some family spend some time with me in St. John’s. But I think it would be wonderful if there was enough support for Air Daffodil in the future, so that Labrador cancer patients could have an escort every time they had to travel. Cancer treatment can be very hard physically and emotionally. No one should have to do it alone.”

Rachwal added cancer patients — including herself — often need to travel several times a year.

“When you’re diagnosed with cancer, there’s a lot of worry,” she said. “I worried about my surgery, I worried about taking care of my children while getting chemotherapy, I’ve worried about my family at home while I was away for a month to get my radiation. 

“Now I worry about whether my treatments are working, I worry about the cancer coming back, and sometimes I worry about whether I’m going to be where to watch my children grow up. Cancer patients shouldn’t have to worry about money, too. The CCS and Air Daffodil help to take a lot of that worry away. Thank you for supporting Air Daffodil.”

Pelley said with today’s announcements, the Air Daffodil account currently sits at $30,000.

“The CCS-NL division is committed to making this program work,” he said. “It’s had its ups and downs abut we’re learning as we go. We’re getting better at it. Moving forward, adequate funding and sound program management will be critical. Once we start selling tickets and some other initiatives, we should be a position in mid to late November to reinstate this important program and not have any other interruptions.”

 

Air Daffodil Car Raffle

Prize: 2015 Buick Encore

Price: $20 each

Draw date: March 19, 2016

Donated by Labrador Motors, Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Tickets available by calling (709) 896-4500

 

 

bonnie.learning@tc.tc

 

At a media event this morning at the Goose Bay Airport, the Canadian Cancer Society-NL division, received cash and in-kind support to go towards it’s Air Daffodil program — a travel fund implemented in 2013 as a pilot project, which was specifically designed to go towards air travel costs for cancer patients from anywhere in Labrador to use for treatment and appointments outside the region.

Air Daffodil was recently re-branded from the former Labrador Air Travel Assistance Program.

Peter Woodward, vice president of operations for Woodward Group of Companies based in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, donated a Buick Encore valued at $33,615.00, which is now up on tickets as a fundraiser for Air Daffodil.

“Labrador has been very good to the Woodward Group and the Woodward family,” said Woodward. “So we’re always looking for ways to give back. So many families in our communities are being impacted by cancer these days. Al (Pelley, vice president of philanthropy for the CCS-NL division) talked about the success they’ve already had over the past year, and I got to be honest; it really moved me and I knew the impact on so many people.

“We’re hoping this is going to be a tremendous fundraiser (and) really hoping this program is going to perpetuate Al’s group and help all the families of the communities to get the treatment they need.”

Stephen Dinn, vice president of business development for Provincial Airlines, also made a generous donation to Air Daffodil today with a cash donation of $10,000.

“I think everybody here is impacted by cancer, whether themselves or family members, colleague or friend,” he said. “We were more than happy to help out with this exciting partnership. We really wanted to give back to the people of Labrador, and felt this was a really special way to do that. We’re going to provide some discounted flights for travel and start off with an initial donation.”

Todd Russell, president of NunatuKavut Community Council, also donated $5,000 on behalf of the NCC, the third donation in that amount over the last two years.

“What a great cause it is when you can help people with the toughest challenge of their life and to  make that challenge little easier,” said Russell. “It’s beautiful to see such diversity of giving from our corporate friends and those so much a part of our community. Many of our people live in communities where travel is difficult. We are a non-profit organization, but we do what we can to give back.”

Demand

Al Pelley, vice president of philanthropy for the CCS-NL division, said when the program first started, no one anticipated the high volume of usage it would get.

Over a period of 14 months, the program has provided a total of 204 one-way flights at a cost of approximately $108,000. Due to the high usage, the program was suspended until more funds could be raised.

“The demand for the service was much greater than we had ever anticipated, which resulted in periodic interruptions in program delivery due to a lack of funds,” explained Pelley.

“As the air travel program was a pilot project, the Society conducted a review to improve efficiencies. In order for this program to continue, it would be necessary to find sustainable funding, develop criteria for client usage and seek out new partners. It was determined that our annual operating budget would be  $100,000 per year. It was further determined that we should have half of that amount — $50,000 — raised before we implement phase II of this program to avoid any further program delivery interruptions.”

Pelley says Air Daffodil has literally been a lifeline for cancer patients in Labrador since it started, calling a cancer diagnosis a major stress due to the heavy financial burden that comes with it.

“This is particularly true for people living with cancer in Labrador,” he said. “It sometimes causes patients to miss treatments because they simply cannot afford the up front costs for travel. This concern was brought to the CCS by a group of concerned individuals and we responded by initiating a fundraising campaign and establishing an air travel assistance program specifically living with cancer in Labrador.”

Valerie Rachwal knows all too well the financial stress associated with a cancer diagnosis.

“I was diagnosed with breast cancer in December of last year,” she told those at the announcement today.

“I was able receive a mastectomy and chemotherapy here in Goose Bay, and I’m presently getting targeted therapy treatments until next April. Since my cancer diagnosis, I have so far had to travel four times to St. John’s to receive medical care that isn’t available in Labrador. Three of those trips were made possible by Air Daffodil. Thanks to this program I was also provided with a ticket for my husband to travel with me as an escort to my very first oncology appointments.”

Rachwal said the first appointments as a cancer patient can be very overwhelming and being able to have someone there for emotional support is very important. 

“Without the help of Air Daffodil  I would have been there alone. This summer, I had to spend a month in St. John’s to receive my radiation treatment. For part of that time, I was able to say at Daffodil Place. On the weekends, I saw many cancer patients staying there leave to drive back to their hometowns on the island. They would return in time to continue their treatments on Monday’s. Unfortunately, patients from Labrador, like myself, don’t have that option.”

Rachwal says it’s not easy being away from family and friends for extended times while getting cancer treatments. 

“Thanks to a community fundraiser, I was able to have some family spend some time with me in St. John’s. But I think it would be wonderful if there was enough support for Air Daffodil in the future, so that Labrador cancer patients could have an escort every time they had to travel. Cancer treatment can be very hard physically and emotionally. No one should have to do it alone.”

Rachwal added cancer patients — including herself — often need to travel several times a year.

“When you’re diagnosed with cancer, there’s a lot of worry,” she said. “I worried about my surgery, I worried about taking care of my children while getting chemotherapy, I’ve worried about my family at home while I was away for a month to get my radiation. 

“Now I worry about whether my treatments are working, I worry about the cancer coming back, and sometimes I worry about whether I’m going to be where to watch my children grow up. Cancer patients shouldn’t have to worry about money, too. The CCS and Air Daffodil help to take a lot of that worry away. Thank you for supporting Air Daffodil.”

Pelley said with today’s announcements, the Air Daffodil account currently sits at $30,000.

“The CCS-NL division is committed to making this program work,” he said. “It’s had its ups and downs abut we’re learning as we go. We’re getting better at it. Moving forward, adequate funding and sound program management will be critical. Once we start selling tickets and some other initiatives, we should be a position in mid to late November to reinstate this important program and not have any other interruptions.”

 

Air Daffodil Car Raffle

Prize: 2015 Buick Encore

Price: $20 each

Draw date: March 19, 2016

Donated by Labrador Motors, Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Tickets available by calling (709) 896-4500

 

 

bonnie.learning@tc.tc

 

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