Vigil held for Burton Winters

Alicia Elson
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Residents demand permanent SAR service in Labrador

Lanterns were lit in memory of Burton Winters during a Candlelight vigil for Burton Winters in Happy Valley Goose Bay last night. Similar vigils were held in towns along the Labrador Coast, and St. John's.

Lanterns lit up the night in Happy Valley Goose Bay last night in memory of Burton Winters during a candlelight vigil for the young boy who died off the coast of Makkovik last week. About 100 people of all ages came out to pay their respects to the boy, and the Inosuttuit Nipingit drumdancers performed a tribute to Burton. Similar vigils were held in Burton's hometown, and other towns along the Labrador Coast. About 30 people gathered at the Confederation Building in St. John's as well, to honour Burton and demand a permanent Search and Rescue squadron stationed in Labrador.

Fourteen-year-old Burton Winters died tragically on the coastal sea ice last week. The boy was reporting missing to the RCMP on Jan. 29 after he did not return home on his snowmobile in the evening. His body was found three days later by on the sea ice about 19 kilometers from his abandoned snowmobile.

In the hours following the ground search efforts additional calls were made o the Canadian Forces SAR for flight support the morning of January 30. Those supports never made it to the community. The response has been questioned by the boy's family, politicians and members of the public.

Members of the Canadian forces addressed the media on Wednesday in St.John's. Rear Admiral Dave Gardam stated that helicopter services were not sent to the community as poor weather conditions prevented the helicopters from flying into the area. Col. Mark Chinner, officer in charge of the Air Coordination Component Element for the Atlantic region, said neither of the two Griffon helicopters stationed in Goose Bay would have been able to respond as both SAR mission helicopters were grounded for maintenance at the time. The situation has caused a national public outcry for a full inquiry into last weeks response to the missing teen. Protests have been scheduled today in Happy Valley Goose Bay to rally in support of permanent Search and Rescue services to be stationed in Labrador.

Organizations: Burton's, Confederation Building, RCMP Canadian Forces

Geographic location: Labrador, Goose Bay, Happy Valley Makkovik St. John's Atlantic

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  • Gordon Chamberlain
    February 15, 2012 - 13:26

    Sorry to hear about the death of Burton Winters I hope this article about Post Traumatic Stress can help people cope with this loss Best wishes and hugs to the family and friends of Burton Gordon Chamberlain Toronto Trauma strikes in many forms, not just on the battle field loosing someone we love is traumatic. The CBC The Current hosted a radio program available online about Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) with links to organizations that I believe people would find beneficial. The links are to Canadian organizations who are seeking to find ways to assist individuals, families and institutions deal with traumas from bullying, crime, accidents, financial trauma, devastating illness and the death of family, friends and our own. We need help getting through life and dealing with Post Traumatic Stress is a useful tool. http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode/2012/01/18/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-not-just-a-military-disorder/ Post-traumatic stress disorder not just a military disorder Ute Lawrence never went to war and never saw a conflict zone. But she did find herself on the wrong stretch of highway one September day 13 yrs ago. And that's when everything changed. One of Canada's most deadly highway pileups sent her on a lonely, uncharted journey through the world of PTSD. Today, we're talking about identifying the traumas that will linger. Listen: (Pop-up) Three of The Current Civilian post-traumatic stress disorder Catherine Galliford says she endured years of sexual harassment as an RCMP Officer and that the experience left her with post-traumatic stress disorder: PTSD. Since she went making her allegations public, at least three other women have emerged to say they too are suffering from PTSD ... all as a result of prolonged sexual harassment in the workplace. PTSD has a long history of being misunderstood and misdiagnosed. For decades, it was viewed with skepticism. And even now, it is often assumed to be something only a war-zone can produce. But people who work in the field say war-related cases of PTSD are just the tip of the iceberg. According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, about 1 in 10 Canadians experiences PTSD and the triggers vary widely, from a violent attack to being fired at work. In that way, the face of PTSD continues to change. To get a better idea of how that's happening, The Current's Shannon Higgins went to visit one woman with PTSD at her home in Toronto. Because of the sensitive nature of her trauma, we have agreed to withhold her name. Ute Lawrence knows how isolating PTSD can be. After she survived one of the most horrific highway accidents in Canadian history, she created the PTSD Association of Canada, the first PTSD organization in North America not focused on the military. Ute Lawrence is also the author of The Power of Trauma: Conquering Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and she was in London, Ontario. Ruth Lanius is the Director of the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Research Unit at the University of Western Ontario. And Dr. Alain Brunet is a Professor of Psychiatry at McGill University and the Director of the Psychosocial Research Division at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute.

  • arthur parsons
    February 13, 2012 - 16:03

    Another screwup by the the people we put in charge of our safety. They should be all fired. This should never have happen

  • Ira Gould,
    February 12, 2012 - 13:01

    Burton Winters - Some One is Accountable Burton should be out enjoying the sunshine with his friends today. This tragedy is inexcusable. We cannot accept lip service from those in authority about this one. Burton, we will continue to fight for justice in this matter. RIP